Australianism

A collection of items regarding Australianism, an idea which, broadly speaking, relates to Australian patriotism and cultural nationalism.
Items of significant interest are marked with an asterisk*.

[Australian candidates for literary fame] [24 June 1824]
An early call for a move towards a more culturally independent Australia, advocating that the Australian intelligentsia be educated in Australia rather than go overseas.

Australianism [14 November 1842]
This article attacks what it sees as the “bigotry” of Australianism.

[A growing Australian consciousness] [25 October 1890]
On the organic development of Australian literature as an indication of a growing Australian consciousness.

[Australia is becoming every day more and more Australian] [29 December 1892]
The writer puts forward the proposition that the increasing population of native-born Australians (in contrast to those who came from overseas) see Australia as their homeland, leading to a growing sense of Australian nationality.

Australian Scenery [27 August 1898]
A poem by Agnes L. Storrie that defends Australian flora and fauna against those who have been unable to perceive the beauty inherent in the Australian bush. A longer version of this poem, entitled “A Protest”, appears in Poems, by Agnes L. Storrie, published in 1909.

Australianism [11 May 1912]
A brief item which calls for a spirit of Australianism, within a context of being against “rabid” Socialism.

My Creed [poem by Grant Hervey, 1913]
A poem by Grant Hervey, which expresses his love for Australia.

* The present status of Australian literature [25 September 1913]
A letter from Grant Hervey urging that Australian literature be used as a way to build the Australian nation.

* “Australianism”: A new cult [1 July 1918]
An article on the ideology of Australianism. From an Australian Army publication, from the First World War.

“The Lone Hand” [30 September 1920]
The magazine The Lone Hand is recommended for its “good Australianism”.

Disloyalty. Bogus Australianism. Condemned by federal ministers. [25 April 1921]
An example of the viewpoint that to be “Australian” was also to be “British”.

Come, Sing Australian Songs to Me! [1921]
A poem by John O’Brien bemoaning the lack of Australian music, or its lack of predominance; a call for an upsurge in Australian music.

The Libel [1921]
A poem by John O’Brien that defends and explains the love of Australian flora and fauna to those who have been unable to perceive the beauty inherent in the Australian bush; defending Australia against those who use her, but fail to appreciate her.

True Australianism: The duty of the teacher [5 January 1921]
Thomas Mutch, Minister for Education (NSW), asks teachers to encourage students in the growth of Australian sentiment, to destroy state “parochial differences”.

* “Australian Ideals”: Lecture by Rev. Father G. E. Herlihy [25 August 1921]
The Rev. Father G. E. Herlihy advocates “inculcating the love of Australia and national sentiments” into the hearts of Australian children.

Towards Australianism [14 May 1923]
A call to foster Australian national sentiment and Australian national ideals, from the Rev. T. O’Loughlin.

Australia’s nationality: A critical “stranger” [14 May 1923]
The Rev. T. O’Loughlin advocates for the development of Australia’s sense of nationality; opposing the hold of Scottish, Irish, English and American cultural influences upon Australia.

Introduction (to Australian Musical Possibilities) [by Bernard O’Dowd, 1924]
Bernard O’Dowd writes that “Australia is not a geographical expression but a spiritual banner”, and welcomes the literature, art, and music which will create “the Commonwealth That Is To Be”.

The Sydney bridge: Insufficient Australianism [16 February 1924]
Randolph Bedford says that there is not sufficient Australianism in Australian politics, with various Australian governments buying goods from foreign countries.

Australia and self-containedness [4 May 1927]
Advocates that Australia moves away from being a nation depending upon primary industries, and instead should develop more secondary industries — for reasons of defence, economic and industrial growth, national character building, and the maintenance of standards of living.

* Our poets and our bush: Australian sentiment [15 June 1929]
This article discusses why overseas-born poets in early Australia could not properly relate to the Australian environment, as they were “strangers in a strange land”, which “coloured the whole of their attitude towards Nature in Australia”.

Australian culture. Plea for outlet. Lack of publishing facilities. [22 August 1929]
Will Dyson advocates the building of a book publishing industry in Australia, to enable the development of Australian literature.

Australian literature: Publishing company to be formed [5 October 1932]
P. R. Stephensen to set up a publishing business, to encourage the growth of a characteristic Australian literature and the expression of a distinctively Australian spirit.

Lions in the path: Book publishing in Australia [31 March 1934]
P. R. Stephensen on the need for a book publishing industry in Australia.

Dull Australia: A refutation [22 September 1934]
This was written at a time when some literary critics considered Australian literature to be an inferior product. Henry Drake promotes Australian books and attacks those who denigrate them. He favourably reviews “Landtakers” by Brian Penton and urges others to buy and appreciate Australian books as a way of encouraging the growth of Australian authors and Australian literature.

* The Foundations of Culture in Australia: An Essay Toward National Self-Respect [by P. R. Stephensen, 1936]
A book by P. R. Stephensen, promoting ideas of Australian cultural nationalism.

Culture in Australia [11 April 1936]
A favourable review of P. R. Stephensen’s book The Foundations of Culture in Australia: An Essay Toward National Self-Respect.

Book Talk: Publicist for Australia [20 February 1937]
An article which is highly critical of P. R. Stephensen and The Publicist, saying that their promotion of their brand of Australianism is carried out in such an abusive and spiteful manner that it is difficult to take their advocacy seriously.

“Rich Australianism”: Mr. W. R. Charlton’s praise [8 October 1937]
William R. Charlton, editor of the Sydney Mail, says that Douglas Pratt’s artworks are “animated by a real and rich Australianism”.

Different people: The Australian character: An authoress’s assessment [13 March 1939]
On the development of the Australian national character and spirit.

Prof. Murdoch urges ‘Australianism’ [16 December 1939]
Professor Walter Murdoch said “If we must have an ’ism (like other countries), let it be ‘Australianism’”.

Australianists [4 January 1941]
A review of Jindyworobak poetry.

Australian writers upheld [30 June 1941]
A letter to the editor, from the poet Ian Mudie, in defence of Australian literature.

Australianism [1941]
An article by Rex Ingamells, published in the Summer 1941 edition of Meanjin.

Australianism urged [28 July 1943]
Jack Beasley, federal Minister for Supply and Shipping, calls for an Australian outlook in all walks of life.

The Australian artist [13 November 1943]
Celebrating the success of Australian artists and authors, and condemning the “cultural cringe” mind-set of those whose believed that Australian works were inferior to European and American works.

Films to foster our tradition: Appeal by Charles Chauvel [11 October 1945]
A film producer promotes the idea of using films to foster Australian culture, as a way of fighting cultural Americanisation.

Political Zionism inconsistent with Australianism [13 July 1946]
A brief article, reporting on Sir Isaac Isaacs, former Australian Governor-General, saying that he considered political Zionism to be inconsistent with Australianism.

One “Ism” For Australia — Australianism! [24 May 1947]
A very brief article, but noteworthy for the democratic Australianist sentiment.

War children as migrants [24 June 1947]
An example of the viewpoint that to be “Australian” was also to be “British”, evidenced in the desire expressed by Howard Beale for Australia to be British, rather than Australian, in culture.

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