The casualties: Careers summarised [3 May 1915]

[Editor: This article gives some personal details of some of the Australian military casualties (killed and wounded) from the Gallipoli campaign (First World War). It was published in The Argus, 3 May 1915.]

The casualties.

Careers summarised.

Lieut.-Colonel H. E. Elliott, one of the best-known Victorian citizen soldiers, is an old Ballarat boy, being a son of Mr. T. Elliott, of that city. He was educated at the Ballarat College, of which he was dux prior to proceeding to the Melbourne University to enter upon the course for the degree of Bachelor of Arts. While he was studying there the South African War broke out, and he enlisted as a private. In South Africa he gained the distinguished conduct medal, and returned as a sergeant. Upon his return to Victoria he completed his course, taking a law exhibition (first year) and graduating as a Master of Arts and a Master of Laws. He now commands the 7th Victorian Battalion of Colonel McCay’s 2nd Infantry Brigade. He was in charge of the Essendon battalion. He got the distinguished conduct medal in South Africa for the smart capture of a party of Boers.

LIEUT.-COLONEL HAWLEY.
Lieut.-Colonel S. Hawley is second in command of the 12th battalion, which was recruited in South Australia, Western Australia, and Tasmania. He was officer commanding the 92nd Launceston Infantry in the Australian military forces, having been appointed in October, 1913.

MAJOR BLEZARD.
Major I. Blezard commands No. 1 company of the 7th Victorian Battalion. He saw service in South Africa, and went to Egypt as a captain, but was given a step in rank on the field as the result of the reorganisation of the force. He commanded in Victoria the E company of the 67th Bendigo Infantry.

MAJOR DAWSON.
Major E. C. Dawson is one of the best rifle shots of Australia. He has been to Bisley with several Australian teams. He is 33 years of age, and commanded No. 1 company of the 1st New South Wales Infantry Battalion.

MAJOR C. H. ELLIOTT.
Major C. H. Elliott commands No. 1 Company of the 12th Battalion. He went to Egypt as a captain, but was given a step in rank when the platoon system was introduced. In the Australian citizen forces he was a captain in the 93rd infantry.

MAJOR ROBERTSON.
Major J. C. Robertson is second in command to Lieut.-Colonel H. W. Lee, in the 9th Battalion. In Australia he was a member of the Army Medical Corps, associated with Woolahra Infantry, N.S.W., as medical officer. He was a soldier as well us a doctor, and was selected by Colonel Sinclair Maclagan on account of his special merits.

CAPTAIN ALDERMAN.
Captain W. W. Alderman was a member of the Permanent Staff in Australia, but went to New Zealand as an exchange officer, and enlisted for service at the war with the Dominion forces. He has attended several courses of instruction abroad, and came through in each instance with distinction.

CAPTAIN FISHER.
Captain J. L. Fisher, who is connected with the 9th Queensland Battalion, went to the war as a lieutenant, but has since been made a company commander Colonel Sinclair-Maclagan’s Third Infantry Brigade, which was the first to leave Egypt.

CAPTAIN FLOCKHART.
Captain R. P. Flockhart commands No. 3 Company of Lieut.-Colonel Wanliss’s 5th Victorian Infantry Battalion. He held the rank of captain in the 51st South Melbourne (Albert Park) Infantry, and held a temporary appointment as area officer in Brunswick. Captain R. P. Flockhart resided with his mother at “Risdon,” The Broadway, East Camberwell. He is 28 years of age, and was a Scotch collegian. He has always been actively engaged in military work, beginning with the cadets in his school-days.

CAPTAIN HERBERT.
Captain M. J. Herbert is commander of No. 4 Company of the 10th (S.A.) Battalion in Colonel Sinclair-Maclagan’s Brigade. He held the rank of captain in the 78th Infantry (East Adelaide), and held the temporary appointment of area officer at Prospect (S.A.).

CAPTAIN HODGSON.
Captain W. K. Hodgson was commander of No. 3 Company in Lieut.-Colonel Bolton’s 8th Battalion. In Victoria he was a captain and company commander in the 48th Kooyong Infantry, which has its headquarters at Surrey Hills.

CAPTAIN JACKSON.
Captain I. Jackson commands No. 4 company of the 9th Battalion, and was associated with Captain Milne as a member of the 4th (Wide Bay) Infantry, Queensland.

CAPTAIN MILNE.
Captain J. A. Milne is also attached to the 9th Queensland Battalion of Colonel Sinclair-Maclagan’s Brigade. In Australia Captain Milne was one of 13 lieutenants attached to the 4th (Wide Bay) Infantry in the citizen forces of Queensland.

CAPTAIN TULLOCH.
Captain E. W. Tullock was at the Melbourne Grammar School from 1897 to 1899. He was in the football team and crew in 1898 and 1899. In 1901 and 1902 he rowed in the Victorian champion crew, and was a member of the Victorian crew in the interstate boat races 1902-3. He was a captain in the 86th Infantry Regiment in Western Australia, but left Melbourne in charge of reinforcements early in the present year.

LIEUTENANT ANDERSON.
Lieutenant P. S. Anderson is the junior subaltern of the 4th New South Wales Battalion, of which Lieut.-Colonel Thompson is the commanding officer. Prior to enrolling in the Expeditionary Force he was not associated with military affairs in Australia.

LIEUTENANT CHAMBERS.
Lieutenant R. W. L. Chambers left Australia as a second lieutenant, but has since been given a step in rank. He is a platoon commander in the 9th Battalion. In Australia he commanded D company of the 7th (Morton Bay) Regiment.

LIEUTENANT CHAMPION.
Lieutenant A. H. Champion is a subaltern in Lieut.-Colonel Dobbins First New South Wales Battalion. In New South Wales he was attached to the 34th Infantry, which draws its recruits from the Enmore district, Sydney.

LIEUTENANT CHAPMAN.
Lieutenant E. H. S. Chapman went to Egypt in a junior capacity, but was promoted to full lieutenant on the field. He was a platoon commander in Lieut.-Colonel Elliott’s 7th Battalion. In the Australian citizen forces he was a provisional lieutenant in the 58th Essendon Rifles.

LIEUTENANT CLOSE.
Lieutenant S.R. Close was platoon commander in the 8th Victorian Battalion under Lieut.-Colonel Bolton. He was well-known in Victorian military circles, particularly in the Ballarat district, where he was attached to the 7th Infantry as a lieutenant on probation.

LIEUTENANT EVANS.
Lieutenant J. A. Evans is a subaltern of the 12th Battalion, having enlisted in Western Australia. He was not associated with the military forces in Australia.

LIEUTENANT GILMOUR.
Second-Lieutenant S. G. Gilmour is also attached to the 5th Victorian Battalion, being a platoon commander. He is attached to the 52nd Hobson’s Bay Infantry, in Victoria, which is commanded by Lieut.-Colonel Wanliss, under whom he is serving at the front.

LIEUTENANT GREEN.
Lieutenant A. Green is a Tasmanian subaltern, and second in command of No 3 company of Lieut.-Colonel Clarke’s 12th Battalion, which is recruited in South Australia, Western Australia, and Tasmania. He held the rank of second lieutenant in the 91st Infantry (Tasmanian Rangers), which is recruited at Devonport and Deloraine.

LIEUTENANT HARVEY.
Lieutenant H. C. Harvey is one of 16 subalterns attached to Lieut.-Colonel Lee’s 9th Queensland Battalion. He held the rank of second lieutenant in the 4th Wide Bay Infantry, Queensland.

LIEUTENANT HEIGHWAY.
Second-Lieutenant A. R. Heighway is with Lieut.-Colonel Elliott’s 7th Victorian Battalion, in the capacity of a platoon commander. In Australia he is also with Colonel Elliott, being connected with the 58th Essendon Rifles. He was an old Wesley Collegian, and was a member of the school rifle team in 1910.

LIEUTENANT HEMPTON.
Lieutenant L. J. Hempton is the senior subaltern of Lieut.-Colonel Dobbins’s Battalion, in which he was one of the first to enlist. In Australia he was one of 25 lieutenants attached to the 29th Australian Rifles, with headquarters in the Glebe District, Sydney.

LIEUTENANT HENDERSON.
Lieutenant Henderson, who died from wounds, was in his 21st year, and was a son of Mr. George Henderson, the well-known city auctioneer. After a successful career at the Church of England Grammar School, Kew, under Canon (now Bishop) Long, he studied for the profession of accountancy, and was engaged on his final studies when the war broke out. Among the first of those who enlisted, his keenness and soldierly ability soon won recognition. He sailed as a second lieutenant with the First Australian Expeditionary Force, and was subsequently promoted in Egypt to the rank of lieutenant in the 7th Infantry, under Lieut.-Colonel Elliott. He had resided with his patents in Burke-road, Camberwell. His brother, Captain R. Henderson, is serving in the same battalion.

LIEUTENANT HOLLAND.
Lieutenant T. Holland is connected with No. 3 Company of the 12th Battalion, having enlisted in South Australia. He saw service in South Africa as a non-commissioned officer. He was a provisional lieutenant in the 76th Hindmarsh Infantry in South Australia.

LIEUTENANT JONES.
Lieutenant L. A. Jones is second in command of No. 2 Company of the 9th Battalion. He was attached to the 8th Oxley Infantry Battalion, in the Queensland military district, when attached to the military forces in Australia.

LIEUTENANT JORGENSEN.
Lieutenant W. R. Jorgensen was a platoon commander in the South Australian section of the 4th Battalion. He was connected with the 78th Adelaide Rifles as a second lieutenant when he enlisted for service.

LIEUTENANT KERSHAW.
Second-Lieutenant R. C. Kershaw is platoon commander in the 1st Battalion of the New South Wales Infantry Brigade. He is an Old Wesley Collegian, and was a successful school athlete. He was a member of the crew that was “head of the river” in 1910, and also formed one of the school rifle team. Other members of the 1910 crew (W. H. Kaighin, W. L. Armstrong, and H. S. Dickenson) are all members of the 1st Battalion.

LIEUTENANT MACDONALD.
Lieutenant D. H. Macdonald was a subaltern of the 11th Battalion. In Australia he was assistant brigade major on the permanent instructional staff at Perth prior to enrolling in the Expeditionary Force.

LIEUTENANT MACFARLANE.
Lieutenant E. M. MacFarlane is a platoon commander of Lieut.-Colonel Owen’s 3rd New South Wales Battalion, in which he was one of the first officers to enrol. He was attached to the 37th Illawarra Infantry in the Citizen forces.

LIEUTENANT PECK.
Lieutenant J. H. Peck is adjutant of the 11th Battalion. He belongs to the permanent instructional staff in Australia, having been detailed for general duties in the West Australian district.

LIEUTENANT PHILLIPS.
Second-Lieutenant A. J. Phillips is attached to the second platoon of No. 3 company, in Lieut.-Colonel Wanliss’s 5th Victorian Battalion. In the citizen forces he is attached to the 51st Albert Park Infantry, of which Lieut.-Colonel R. E. Courtney is the commanding officer.

LIEUTENANT PRISK.
Lieutenant R. C. G. Prisk is second in command of a company in the 6th Victorian Infantry Battalion, which is now in charge of Major McNicholl, who succeeded Lieut.-Colonel Semmens when he was invalided home.

LIEUTENANT RIDDELL.
Lieutenant C. C. Kiddell is a platoon commander of the 6th Victorian Battalion. He held the rank of second lieutenant in the University Rifles of Melbourne, and was welcomed in Egypt by General Birdwood as a near relative. He is the son of Colonel Riddell, and was at the Melbourne Grammar School from 1901-1904. He afterwards entered Trinity College, and took the degree of bachelor of science at the Melbourne University.

LIEUTENANT RODGERS.
Lieutenant F. O. Rodgers is a platoon commander of the 7th Victorian Battalion commanded by Lieut.-Colonel Elliott. He held the rank of second lieutenant in the 58th Essendon Rifles.

LIEUTENANT SMITH.
Lieutenant E. W. C. Smith is second in command of a company in Lieut.-Colonel Weir’s 10th South Australian Battalion. So far as can be learned, he was not connected with the citizen forces prior to enlisting.

LIEUTENANT SPARGO.
Lieutenant E. B. Spargo is attached to No. 2 Company of the 6th Victorian Battalion, which, until recently, was commanded by Lieut.-Colonel Semmens, who has been invalided home. In the Victorian forces he is a lieutenant in the 63rd East Melbourne Battalion. He entered the Melbourne Grammar School in 1907, and was a member of the athletic team in that year.

LIEUTENANT STEEN.
Lieutenant G. Steen was a platoon commander, in the First Battalion. He also was attached in Australia to the Australian Rifles, being in command of F company, which is recruited in Rozelle, Sydney.

LIEUTENANT WALKER.
Lieutenant H. H. Walker left Australia as a second lieutenant with the 11th West Australian Battalion, but he has since been made a platoon commander. He was not connected with the military forces as an officer before enlisting in the Expeditionary Forces.

PRIVATE D’ALTON.
Henry St. Eloy D’Alton, prior to enlisting, was a prominent Dimboola rifle shot, and for a time honorary secretary of the Dimboola Rifle Club. He competed in the V.R.A. matches in the A and B series held in November, 1913. He also was a competitor in the Gippsland matches during the Easter of that year. Always a good and most enthusiastic rifle shot, he was of considerable strength to his union and his club in all teams matches. His duties as shire secretary brought him in close touch with almost all the ratepayers of the shire of Dimboola, to whom he was always advocating the use of the rifle. When volunteers were called for active service, with his brother he was amongst the first in camp.

SERGEANT HOOKE.
Sergeant Hooke was a grandson of Mr. J. F. H. Mitchell, a squatter of Ravenswood, and followed the occupation of an accountant at the head office of the Bank of Australasia, Collins street. He was 26 years of age, and married Miss Constance Huon the day before he sailed for the front.

PRIVATE DUNT.
Private Frank Dunt was born in Geelong, and lived there until a few months ago, when he went to Melbourne. He enlisted from Geelong. He was a son of Mr. Herbert Dunt, who carried on business as a butcher in Geelong for many years. Frank Dunt was a very popular young man, 27 years of age. One of the last postcards received in Geelong from him stated, “Hope to see you again in the near future.”



Source:
The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), 3 May 1915, p. 8

[Editor: Changed “No. 2 Company of the 9th Batlation” to “No. 2 Company of the 9th Battalion”.]

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