Chapter 40 [The Eureka Stockade, by Raffaello Carboni, 1855]

[Editor: This is a chapter from The Eureka Stockade by Raffaello Carboni. A glossary has been provided to explain various words and phrases that may be unfamiliar to modern readers.]

XL.

Beati qui sunt pacifici, quoniam filii Dei vocabuntur.

It was dark: myself took the light in the council room.

Father P. Smyth and Mr. George Black were present; both looking serious and anxious.

All of us were much concerned, and felt the responsibility of our position. By this time the diggers from all parts had swelled to the number of eight hundred. They were not clamorous, they wanted to know what was determined on by the leaders.

Proposed by Black, seconded by Manning, “That a deputation from the armed diggers, should be forthwith sent to the Camp —

“1. To demand — that was our temper in those days — the immediate release of those diggers who had been dragged to the lock-up in the morning hunt, for want of the licence.

“2. To demand from Commissioner Rede a pledge not to come out any more for licence-hunting.”

Two of us were to form the deputation, and proceed at once.

Father Smyth proposed Mr. Black, Lalor proposed Signor Raffaello: agreed to unanimously. This news, being made public to the diggers, was well received by all; and the council kept sitting until our return.

The deputation was accompanied by Father Smyth. It was a starry night, and rather cold; the moon shone in all its southern splendour. On approaching the main road, the noisy band of Row’s Circus, and the colonial cursing and shouting from inveterate grog-bibbers, forced into my mind the meditation, “Unde bella et pugna inter vos?” etc. — James, chap. iv.

We met here and there several groups, who were anxiously discussing the events of the day, and the probable consequences. Mr. Black kindly and plainly informed them of our mission. On reaching the bridge, we found it guarded by the police. Father Smyth had an easy pass, and went by himself to speak first at head-quarters, for the safety of our persons.



Source:
Raffaello Carboni. The Eureka Stockade: The Consequence of Some Pirates Wanting on Quarter-Deck a Rebellion, Public Library of South Australia, Adelaide, 1962 [facsimile of the 1855 edition], pages 52-53

Editor’s notes:
beati qui sunt pacifici, quoniam filii dei vocabuntur = (Latin) “blessed are the peacemakers, for they shall be called sons of God”; from Matthew 5:9 in the Latin Bible [also rendered as “beati pacifici, quoniam filii Dei vocabuntur”, “blessed are the peacemakers: for they shall be called the children of God”]

unde bella et pugna inter vos [unde bella et pugnae inter vos] = (Latin) “From whence are wars and contentions among you?”, or, “What is the source of quarrels and conflicts among you?”, or “What causes these fights and quarrels among you?”; from James 4:1 in the Latin Bible

References:
beati qui sunt pacifici, quoniam filii dei vocabuntur:
Novum Testamentum Domini Nostri Jesu Christi D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1863, page 4 (accessed 7 January 2013)
Matthew 5”, New Advent (accessed 7 January 2013)
Matthew 5:9”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)
Matthew 5:9 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)

unde bella et pugnae inter vos:
Novum Testamentum Domini Nostri Jesu Christi D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1863, page 259 (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4”, New Advent (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)

Speak Your Mind

*