Chapter 98 [The Eureka Stockade, by Raffaello Carboni, 1855]

[Editor: This is a chapter from The Eureka Stockade by Raffaello Carboni. A glossary has been provided to explain various words and phrases that may be unfamiliar to modern readers.]

XCVIII.

Sunt tempora nostra!

That is the following from Toorak.

“Colonial Secretary’s Office, Melbourne,

“October 8th, 1855.

“Sir, — Advertising to your correspondence (September 30th), in reply to my letter of the 20th ultimo, I am directed by His Excellency to state that government are compelled to adhere to fixed rules — THEY BY NO MEANS DOUBT THE VERACITY OF YOUR STATEMENT, but they have a duty to the public to perform, which imposes the necessity of never granting money in compensation, except when the clearest evidence of the loss is given, and that a personal statement no matter by whom given, is never accepted as sufficient testimony.

I have the honour to be,

Sir,
J. MOORE, A.C.S.”

Mr. Carboni Raffaello,
Gravel-pits, Ballaarat-flat.

———

A Cheer-up written for the Magpie of Ballaarat, perched on the Southern Cross Hotel, Magpie-gully.

No more from Moore;
Too dear! his store.
Hang the “Compensation:”
Speak of “RESTITUTION!”
Do not steal! ’s an old Institution,
Restituere? Popish innovation.

CHORUS.
Coo-hee! Great works at Toorak!
Coo-hee! Keep clear of th’ WOOL-pack.

WATERLOOBOLTER CHIMES.
SIP sop stir-up Toorak small beer
do si la sol fa me re do
Nip nap wash down chops nacks oh! dear.



Source:
Raffaello Carboni. The Eureka Stockade: The Consequence of Some Pirates Wanting on Quarter-Deck a Rebellion, Public Library of South Australia, Adelaide, 1962 [facsimile of the 1855 edition], page 124

Editor’s notes:
restituere = (Latin) “restore” (or “bring back”, or “make good”)

*sunt tempora nostra = (Latin) “these are our times” (*rough translation) [Carboni uses the phrase “sunt tempora nostra” in chapters I (1), LXXXIX (89), XCVIII (98), and C (100)]

References:
restituere:
restituere”, Latdict: Latin Dictionary and Grammar Resources (accessed 18 January 2013)
Joseph Esmond Riddle and Thomas Kerchever Arnold. A Copious and Critical English-Latin lexicon, Founded on the German-Latin Dictionary of Dr. Charles Ernest Georges (8th edition), Longmans, Green, and Co. and J. and H. Rivington, London, 1865, pages 148 (“condition”), 163 (“restore”), and 165 (“return”) (accessed 18 January 2013)

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