Glossary (part 2) [for The Eureka Stockade, by Raffaello Carboni]

The Eureka Stockade by Raffaello Carboni is full of terms and references that would be unfamiliar to the majority of modern readers; therefore, various words and phrases are listed here as an explanatory aid. To make this glossary more accessible, particulary in relation to foreign words and phrases, entries with initial articles are listed alphabetically inclusive of the initial article (e.g. “la vita” is located under L).

Raffaello Carboni utilized many French, Italian and Latin phrases in The Eureka Stockade, with a particular emphasis on quoting Biblical passages and classic Latin authors, such as Cicero, Horace, Ovid, and Virgil. A sizable amount of this glossary deals with translations and noting the origins of the phrases quoted or alluded to by Carboni. A large number of references have also been provided.

This is part two of the glossary (covering L-Z); click here for part one of the glossary (covering A-K).



labor omnia vincit = (Latin) “labor [work] overcomes everything”, or “labor overcomes all difficulties”, or “labor conquers all”; from “Georgics”, book 1 (line 145) by Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro, 70 BC – 19 BC) [the extended quotation is “labor omnia vincit improbus”, translated as “persistent work conquers all” or “hard work conquers all”]
P. Vergili Maronis Georgicon Liber Primvs”, The Latin Library [“labor omnia uicit”] (accessed 30 December 2012)
Virgil [translated by David R. Slavitt]. Eclogues and Georgics of Virgil, John Hopkins University Press, 1990, page xvii (accessed 30 December 2012)
Publii Virgilii Maronis [edited by the Rev. J. G. Cooper]. Opera, or, The Works of Virgil, Robinson, Pratt, and Co., New York, 1841, page 67 (accessed 30 December 2012)
Jean-Jacques Rousseau [translated by Angela Scholar]. Confessions, Oxford University Press, Oxford, 2000 page 651, note 22 (accessed 30 December 2012)
Richard M. Krill. Greek & Latin in English Today, third revised edition, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Wauconda, Illinois, 1993 (reprinted 1998), page 243 (accessed 30 December 2012)

Lalor stump, Bakery-Hill = refers to Lalor standing upon a tree stump, at the meeting on Bakery Hill, to address the miners; although, “on the stump” can also be used in a figurative sense, to refer to someone giving a speech

La Trobian idlers = a negative reference to officials of the government of Charles La Trobe, in colonial Victoria, as being idle or lazy

* La verita, se docile, quadagna = (Italian) “The truth, if docile, quadagna” (*rough translation)

*La vita in grammatical = (Italian) “Life in grammar” (*rough translation)

*La vita poi in pratica = (Italian) “The life then in practice” (*rough translation)

*la volpe cambia il pelo, ma non la pelle = (Italian) “the fox changes the hair, but not skin” (*rough translation) [from the Italian proverb “il lupo il pelo cambia ma non il vizio” (“the wolf may change his coat but not his vice/s”)]
Niccolo Amenta. Della Lingua Nobile d’Italia e del Modo di Leggiadramente Scrivere in essa non che di Perfettamente Parlare” [The Noble Language of Italy . . .], Antonia Muzio, Napoli [Naples, Italy], 1723, page 91 (“La Volpe cambia il pelo, ma non la pelle, La Vipera cambia laspoglia, via non lafeia il veleno” is located on the 8th and 9th last lines of the page) (accessed 8 January 2013)
Joseph Ricapito. “The Wisdom of Proverbs: Proverbs from Italy in Italian and in dialect from Giovinazzo in Apulia”, The Center for Technology-Enhanced Language Learning and Instruction, School of Languages and Cultures, Purdue University (accessed 8 January 2013)

licentiousness = having no regard for accepted rules or standards; ignoring the law or lacking moral discipline

lightsome = well-lit, bright

loquar in amaritudine animoe meoe [aniae meae] = (Latin) “I will speak in the bitterness of my soul”; from Job 10:1 in the Latin Bible
Job 10”, New Advent (accessed 3 January 2013)
Job 10:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 3 January 2013)

Lo schiavo che vuol finir le sue pene = (Italian) “O slaves who desire to end your suffering”

ludi Ballaaratenses = (Latin) “games in Ballaarat”

l’union fait la force = (French) “the union makes strength”, which is also translated variously as “unity makes strength”, “unity means strength”, “from unity comes strength”, and “in unity there is strength”

magna opera Domini = (Latin) “great are the works of the Lord”; from Psalm 110:2 in the Latin Vulgate Bible [in various other Bibles, this is in Psalm 111:2, as the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible]
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page 432 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalm 111”, New Advent (accessed 18 January 2013) [Psalm 111:2]
Psalm 111:2”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)
Psalms 110:2 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)

marionette = (French) “puppet”

*ma senza Gloria = (Italian) “but without glory” (*rough translation)

Mazzini = Giuseppe Mazzini (1805-1872), Italian revolutionary

MDCCCLV = (Roman numerals) 1855

*merci bien, je sors d’en prendre = (French) “thank you very much, I’m going to take” (*rough translation)

*melior nunc lingua favere = (Latin) “improved language support now” (*rough translation)

*Mendacium sibi, sicut turbinis, viam augustam in urbe et orbe terrarum aperuit. = “A lie to another, as of a whirlwind, the way of august in the city over the world, and opened it.”

* Mistero! S’apre mendacia, violente = (Italian) “Mystery! Opens mendacity, violent” (*rough translation)

*Mon ardent desir, mon tourment presque, c’est d’avoir vite l’honneur de parler, encore une fois sur la terre, a = (French) “My ardent desire, almost my torment is to have the honor of speaking quickly again on the earth” (*rough translation)

moustachios = moustache, particularly with hair growing down the sides of the mouth in the style sometimes referred to as “handle-bars”

myrmidons = minions, or loyal followers, especially those who carry out orders unquestioningly or unscrupulously (from the Myrmidons, a legendary people of Greek history)

nam tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet = (Latin) “for your property is in danger when the neighbouring wall [house] is on fire”, or “it is your concern when your neighbours’ wall is on fire”; from Epistles, Book I, section XVIII (line 84), by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65 BC – 8 BC)
Jon R. Stone. The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati’s Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs, and Sayings, Routledge, New York, 2005, page 119 [see entry: “tua res agitur, paries cum proximus ardet”] (accessed 29 December 2012)
Famous Quotes from 100 Great People, Mobile Reference [e-book, 2011, page 1161] (accessed 29 December 2012)
Q. Horati Flacci Epistvlarvm Liber Primvs”, The Latin Library (accessed 29 December 2012)

*narravere patres nostri et nos narravimus omnes = (Latin) “our fathers have told us, and we have described all the” (*rough translation) [note: the phrase “narravere patres et nos narrabimus” appears in Gotthold Ephraim Lessings: Samtliche Schriften, (1889)]
Karl Lachmann (editor). Gotthold Ephraim Lessings: Samtliche Schriften [Gotthold Ephraim Lessing: All Writings and Letters], Goschen, 1889, page 223 (4th line)] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)
Gotthold Ephraim Lessing: Bibliography”, Encyclopædia Britannica (accessed 9 January 2013)

*Nein, sagte ich mirselbst, nein, eine solche eckliche Wirthschaft habe ich noch nie geseh’n = (German) “No, I told myself, no, such a nasty business, I have seen a never” [Nein, sagte ich mir selbst, nein, eine solche eklige Wirtschaft habe ich noch nie geseh’n] (*rough translation)

nil desperandum = (Latin) “never despair” or “do not despair”

nobbler = a dram of spirits (a dram can be taken to mean a small amount, usually of an alcoholic drink; although it is actually a specific measurement, of one-eighth of an ounce or one-sixteenth of an ounce, depending on the source)

nolens volens = “willing or unwilling” (“willy-nilly”); from the Latin “nolens” (“unwilling”) and “volens” (“willing”) [the term appears in Book 7 of Historia Expeditionis Hierosolymitanae (“History of the Expedition to Jerusalem”) by Albert of Aix (circa. 1120)] [Carboni uses the phrase “nolens volens” in chapters XLII (42) and LI (51)]
Albert Of Aix: Historia Hierosolymitanae Expeditionis: Liber VII”, The Latin Library (accessed 9 January 2013)
Albert of Aix”, Encyclopædia Britannica (accessed 9 January 2013)

*Nom d’un nom! c’est affreux. Ces malheureuf sont-ils donc possedes = (French) “Name of a name! It’s awful. This is unfortunate, are they possessed” (*rough translation)

nom de guerre = (French) literally “name of war”; a pseudonym

**non ex illis Mecoenates = (Latin) “not one of them a Mecoenates”; a reference to Gaius Cilnius Maecenas (70 BC–8 BC; different spellings of his name have been used: Maecenas, Mecaenas), who was a patron of the arts in ancient Rome, as a consequence of which patrons of the arts came to be called “Maecenates”
Gaius Maecenas”, Encyclopædia Britannica (accessed 9 January 2013)
Gaius Maecenas”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)
Sir Richard Colt Hoare. A Classical Tour Through Italy and SicilyGenesis 45”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Genesis 45:24”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Genesis 45:24”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)

non nobis, non nobis, sed pax vobiscum = (Latin) “not to us, not to us, but peace be with you”; from a combination of two verses in the Bible: from Psalm 113: in the Latin Vulgate Bible [in various other Bibles, this is in Psalm 115:1, as the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible], “Non nobis, Domine, non nobis, sed nomini tuo da gloriam” (“Not to us, O Lord, not to us; but to thy name give glory”) [Psalm 113:9 is used as a short Latin hymn, known as “Non nobis”]; and from Genesis 43:23 in the Latin Bible, “At ille respondit: Pax vobiscum” (“But he answered: Peace be with you”)
non nobis, non nobis:
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page page 433 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalms 113:9 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalm 114/115”, New Advent [Psalm 114/115:9] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalm 115:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Non nobis”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)
pax vobiscum:
Genesis 43 ”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Genesis 43:23”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)

non sit nobis vanum mane surgere ante lucem = (Latin) “let it not be vain for us to rise up early before light”; from the Invitatory antiphon in the traditional Breviary used in the Catholic Church during Lent; although normally the phrase uses the word “vobis” (you) rather than “nobis” (us), “non sit vobis vanum mane surgere ante lucem”]
Psalm 118 Heth/2: Dark times for the Church and the need for faithful monasticism”, Psallam Domino, 9 March 2012 (accessed 9 January 2013)
Aldobrandini de Cavalcantibus: Sermones dominicales”, Corpus Thomisticum [see text under: “[88543] Aldobrandinus de Cavalcantibus, Sermones, pars 1 n. 38”] (accessed 9 January 2013)
The Christian Year — Advent to Pascha”, Saint Bonaventure’s Mission [site by David A. E. Horsman] (accessed 27 January 2013)
List of chants”, CANTUS: A database for Latin ecclesiastical chants [see entry: “Dom. 1 Quadragesimae: Non sit nobis vanum mane”] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Breviarium Romanum Ex Decreto Sacrosancti Concilii Tridentini Restitutum, Friderici Pustet, Ratisbonæ [Regensburg, Germany], 1888 page 131 [see the 1st column, 7th line from bottom] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Breviarium Romanum, Ex Decreto ss. Concilii Tridentini, Rusand, Paris, 1828, page 2 [see the 1st column, last line; the phrase also appears three times in the 2nd column] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Antiphonary”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)

nota bene = (Italian) “note well”; from the Latin notāre (“to note”) and bene (“well”) [commonly abbreviated as “n.b.”, used in texts to call attention to a notation of significance]

*nous allons bientot avoir la Republique Australienne = (French) “we will soon have the Australian Republic” (*rough translation)

odi profanum vulgus et arceo = (Latin) “I hate the profane masses and keep them at a distance”, or “I hate the unholy rabble and keep them away”; from Odes, Book 3, section I (line 1), by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65 BC – 8 BC)
Jon R. Stone. The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati’s Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs, and Sayings, Routledge, New York, 2005, page 295 (accessed 29 December 2012)
Odi Profanvm Vvlgvs Et Arceo”, LatinR (accessed 29 December 2012)
Q. Horati Flacci Carminvm Liber Tertivs”, The Latin Library [“Odi profanum uolgus et arceo”] (accessed 29 December 2012)

*Oh, pardon, Monseigneur: ou l’on vous a toujours mal informe; ou l’on vous a souvent cache la verite: malheureusement, cela n’a pas beaucoup change meme aujourd’hui = (French) “Oh, sorry, my lord: and you were always misinformed, or you have been often hides the truth: Unfortunately, this has not changed much even today” (*rough translation)

*ortica Ballaaratensis prima = (Italian) “nettle Ballaarat first” (*rough translation) (Ortica is the name of a plant, a stinging nettle, which derives its name from the Latin word “urtica”) [the title of chapter XXIII (23), “Ortica Ballaaratensis: Prima”, relates to the title of chapter XXIV (24), “Ortica ensis: Secunda”]

*Ortica ensis: secunda = (Latin) “nettle blade: second” (*rough translation) (Ortica is the name of a plant, a stinging nettle, which derives its name from the Latin word “urtica”) [the title of chapter XXIII (23), “Ortica Ballaaratensis: Prima”, relates to the title of chapter XXIV (24), “Ortica ensis: Secunda”]

“Othello occupation” would indeed soon “be gone,” = a reference to the play “Othello”, by William Shakespeare (1564 BC – 1616 BC), in which Othello, a general in the Venetian army, believes that his wife was unfaithful to him, and subsequently loses interest in his livelihood and declares “Farewell! Othello’s occupation’s gone” (in Act 3, Scene 3); the use of the phrase “Othello’s occupation” is in reference to the military, who were used in the service of the government’s goldfields’ policies (hence Carboni says “the fault lies at the door of the government, in prostituting the military, by making them tax collectors, and placing them at the disposal of a few vain officials”)
Othello: Act 3, Scene 3”, Shakespeare Navigators (accessed 31 January 2013)
Othello’s Self Esteem”, Shakespeare Navigators (accessed 31 January 2013)
Shakespeare Quotes: Pomp and circumstance”, E Notes (accessed 31 January 2013)
Othello (character)”, Wikipedia (accessed 31 January 2013)

*Pardon, Monsiegneur, apres lecture des versets 28, 29, du chap. I., et versets 17, 18, 19, du chap. III., de la Genese, favorisez s’il vous plait l’exploitation de l’activite de tous ces gaillards la, par la Charrue: il n’y a pas mal de terres ici, et bien pour tout le monde. = (French) “Forgiveness Monsiegneur, after reading verses 28, 29 of chap. I., and verses 17, 18, 19, of chap. III., Of Genesis, promote please operate the activity of all the lads, the Plough: there is a lot of land here, and good for everyone.” (*rough translation)

*pas a Ballaarat, Monseigneur = (French) has not Ballaarat, Monseigneur (*rough translation)

peccator videbit et irascetur; dentibus suis fremet et tabescet: desiderium peccatorum peribit = (Latin) “the wicked shall see, and shall be angry, he shall gnash with his teeth and pine away: the desire of the wicked shall perish”; from Psalm 111:10 in the Latin Vulgate Bible [in various other Bibles, this is in Psalm 112:10, as the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible]
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page 433 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalm 112”, New Advent [Psalm 112:10] (accessed 18 January 2013)
Psalm 112:10”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)
Psalms 111:10 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)

pecunia omnia vincit = (Latin) “money conquers all”, or “money overcomes everything” (similar to the Latin phrase “labor omnia vincit”, i.e. “labor conquers all”, or “labor overcomes everything”)

pennyweights = a pennyweight was 1⁄20 of an ounce or 1⁄240 of a pound of sterling silver [a pennyweight was usually abbreviated as dwt, being d from “denarius” (the small silver Roman coin) and wt for “weight”; pennyweight may also be abbreviated as pwt or pw]

*petite, sed non accipietis, quia petistis = (Latin) “you ask, but you will not receive, because you desired” (*rough translation); from James 4:3 in the Latin Bible, “petitis, et non accipitis, eo quod male petatis” (“you ask and receive not, because you ask amiss”, or “you ask and do not receive, because you ask with wrong motives”)
James 4”, New Advent (accessed 14 January 2013)
James 4:3”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 14 January 2013)
James 4:3 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 14 January 2013)

phisiog = physiognomy, the art of judging a man’s character and temperament by his physical appearance (from the Greek “physiognōmōn”)

play out the play = the character of Jack Falstaff says the line “Play out the play” in Henry IV, Part I (Act 2, Scene 4), by William Shakespeare (1564 BC – 1616 BC)
The First part of King Henry the Fourth: Act 2, Scene 4”, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (accessed 31 January 2013)
The Dramatic Works of William Shakespeare, Volume 1, M’Carty & Davis, and H.C. Carey & I. Lea, Philadelphia, 1824, page 402 (accessed 31 January 2013)

*populus ex terra crescit: multitudo hominum est populus: ergo, multitudo hominum ex terra crescit = (Latin) “the people grow out of the earth: and the people were a multitude of men: therefore, a multitude of men from the earth grows” (*rough translation) [note: an almost identical phrase appears in Opera Omnia by Johann Gottlieb Heineccius (1681–1741)]
Io. Gottlieb Heineccii. Opera Omnia, Fratrum de Tournes, Genevae [Geneva, Switzerland], 1771, page 60 [section CIII (103): “populus ex terra crescit. Multitudo hominum est populus. Multitudo ergo hominum ex terra crescit”] [the author’s name is also rendered as Johann Gottlieb Heinecke, or Johann Gottlieb Heineccius] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Johann Gottlieb Heineccius”, (accessed 9 January 2013)

porter = a dark beer, used in the 1700s and 1800s

*Por vida deDios! por supuesto jo fuera el Duke de Alba, esos Gavachos, carajo, yo los pegaria de bueno = (Spanish) “For God’s life! jo course was the Duke of Alba, these foreigners, damn, I would stick to good” (*rough translation) [“carajo” is an expletive that has several translations; “Gavachos” or “Gabacho” is a negative term regarding foreigners]
Gabacho”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)

*Pour votre bonheur, Monseigneur, Sebastopol leur donne assez d’occupation pour le moment = (French) “For your happiness, my lord, Sebastopol gives them enough time occupation for” (*rough translation)

prick John Bull at his £. s. d = this is a reference to affecting the British administration via its finances; “£. s. and d.” were the abbreviations for the basic British-style currency denominations then in use in the colonies of Australia, i.e. “pounds, shillings and pence”

Prince Albert = the Prince Albert Hotel (in Ballarat, Victoria)

propria persona = (Latin) “one’s own person”; in the legal field, “in propria persona” refers to someone appearing on their own behalf (not being represented by a lawyer)

Psalm numbering = the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible
Psalm numbers”, Psalterium (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalms”, Wikipedia [see section “Numbering”] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalms”, Vulgate (accessed 9 January 2013)

Punch = Punch magazine

quadrupedante putrem sonitu quatit ungula campum = (Latin) “Then struck the hoofs of the steeds on the ground with a four-footed trampling”, or “The horses’ hooves with four-fold beat did shake the crumbling plain”; from Aeneid, book 8 (line 596), by Virgil (Publius Vergilius Maro, 70 BC – 19 BC)
Proverbial expressions, Internet Sacred Text Archive (accessed 10 January 2013)
Quadrupedante putrem sonitu quatit ungula campum”, Brendan Patrick Hughes (accessed 10 January 2013)
P. Vergili Maronis Aeneidos Liber Octavvs”, The Latin Library [“quadripedante putrem sonitu quatit ungula campum”] (accessed 10 January 2013)

*quando prosperus et jucundus amicorum es fecundus; si fortuna perit, nullus amicus erit = (Latin) “when successful and pleasant, friends are abundant; but if fortune fails, we will have no friends” (*rough translation); derived from Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC – 17 AD), “tempore felici multi numerantur amici; si fortuna perit, nullus amicus erit” (“in happy times we reckon many friends; but if fortune fails, we will have no friends”)
Jon R. Stone. The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati’s Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs, and Sayings, Routledge, New York, 2005, page 117 (accessed 31 January 2013)

quelle farce = (French) “what a joke” or “what a farce”

quem patronem rogaturus [quem patronum rogaturus] = (Latin) “what patron I to beseech?”, or “to what patron choose to pray”, or “which patron to ask”; a line from the Latin hymn “Dies Irae” (“Day of Wrath”), believed to have been written by Thomas of Celano (circa. 1200 – circa.1255), and used as a part of the Requiem Mass (Mass for the Dead) in the Roman Catholic Church [also used as a line in the play Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)] [Carboni used the preceding line from “Dies Irae” as the title for chapter LXXVI (76)]
Dies Irae”, The Franciscan Archive (accessed 27 December 2012)
The Eclectic Review, MDCCCXXXVII; January – June; New Series, Vol. I, William Ball, London, 1837, page 40 (2nd last line) (accessed 27 December 2012)]
Dies Irae”, Wikipedia (accessed 10 January 2013)
Hymni Et Cantica”, The Latin Library [see: “Dies irae (Hymnus in exequiis) Thomas of Celano, fl.1215”] (accessed 10 January 2013)
Thomas of Celano”, The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent (accessed 27 December 2012)
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller (translated by Lord Francis Leveson Gower). Faust: A Drama, by Goethe. And Schiller’s Song of the Bell, John Murray, London, 1823, page 230

quid sum miser, nunc dicturus [quid sum miser, tunc dicturus] = (Latin) “What am I the wretch then to say?”, or “Ah then, poor soul, what wilt thou say”, or “What am I, miserable, then to say?”; a line from the Latin hymn “Dies Irae” (“Day of Wrath”), believed to have been written by Thomas of Celano (circa. 1200 – circa.1255), and used as a part of the Requiem Mass (Mass for the Dead) in the Roman Catholic Church, although Carboni has used the word “nunc” (“now”), whereas the line in the Mass is given with the word “tunc” (“then”), “quid sum miser, tunc dicturus” [also used as a line in the play Faust by Johann Wolfgang von Goethe (1749-1832)] [Carboni used the following line from “Dies Irae” as the title for chapter LXXXI (81)]
Dies Irae”, The Franciscan Archive (accessed 27 December 2012)
The Eclectic Review, MDCCCXXXVII; January – June; New Series, Vol. I, William Ball, London, 1837, page 40 (4th last line) (accessed 27 December 2012)]
Dies Irae”, Wikipedia (accessed 10 January 2013)
Hymni Et Cantica”, The Latin Library [see: “Dies irae (Hymnus in exequiis) Thomas of Celano, fl.1215”] (accessed 10 January 2013)
Thomas of Celano”, The Catholic Encyclopedia, New Advent (accessed 27 December 2012)
Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and Friedrich Schiller (translated by Lord Francis Leveson Gower). Faust: A Drama, by Goethe. And Schiller’s Song of the Bell, John Murray, London, 1823, page 230

qui potest capere capiat = (Latin) “he that can take, let him take it”, or “he who is able to accept this, let him accept it”; from Matthew 19:12 in the Latin Bible (“capiat” has been translated in various versions of the Bible as “accept”, “grasp”, “receive”, and “take”)
Matthew 19”, New Advent (accessed 18 January 2013)
Matthew 19:12”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)
Matthew 19:12 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 18 January 2013)
Matthew 19:12”, Bible Gateway (accessed 18 January 2013)

quis dabit capiti meo, aquam et oculis meis fontem lacrymarum et plorabo die ac nocte = (Latin) “Oh that my head were waters and my eyes a fountain of tears, that I might weep day and night”, or “Who will give water to my head, and a fountain of tears to my eyes? And I will weep day and night”; from Jeremiah 9:1 in the Latin Bible
Jeremiah 9”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Jeremiah 9:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Jeremias 9:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)

quos vult perdere deus dementat = (Latin) “those whom God wishes to destroy he drives mad”; from an unknown author of ancient Greece, this line is also given in Latin as “quem deus vult perdere, dementat prius” (commonly rendered as “those whom the gods would destroy, they first make mad”)
Ezra Greenspan, Lindeth Vasey, John Worthen (editors). The Cambridge Edition of the Works of D. H. Lawrence (Studies in Classic American Literature, Volume 2), Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2003, page 471 (accessed 7 January 2013)
John Bartlett, Emily Morison Beck [editors]. Familiar Quotations. A Collection of Passages, Phrases and Proverbs Traced to Their Sources in Ancient and Modern Literature (14th Edition), Little, Brown and Company, Boston, 1968, page 86, page 49 (accessed 7 January 2013)
Sidney Chawner Woodhouse (editor). Latin Dictionary: Latin-English, English-Latin, Routledge & Kegan Paul, London, 1987 (c1913), page 49 (accessed 7 January 2013)
Euripides”, Wikiquote [see the “Misattributed” section] (accessed 7 January 2013)

Quousque tandem abutere, Toorak, patientia nostra = (Latin) “How long will you abuse, Toorak, our patience?”; derived from a speech made in the Roman Senate by Cicero (Marcus Tullius Cicero, 106 BC – 43 BC) attacking Catiline (Lucius Sergius Catilina, 108 BC – 62 BC), “Quousque [Quo usque] tandem abutere, Catilina, patientia nostra” (“How long, Catiline, will you abuse our patience?”)
Archibald A. Maclardy. Completely Parsed Cicero: The First Oration Of Cicero Against Catiline, Bolchazy-Carducci Publishers, Wauconda (Illinois), 2004, pages ii, 1 (accessed 7 January 2013)
Cicero’s Orations”, Project Gutenberg (accessed 7 January 2013)
Catiline Orations”, Wikipedia (accessed 7 January 2013)
L. Annaei Senecae Maioris Suasoriarum Liber”, The Latin Library (accessed 7 January 2013)
Seneca the Elder”, Wikipedia (accessed 7 January 2013)

Raffaelle = presumably a reference to the famous Italian painter of the Renaissance period Raffaello Sanzio da Urbino (known as Raphael) (1483-1520) [potentially, but not likely, a reference to the Italian artist Raffaelle Castellini (died 1864)]

red coats = British soldiers

red toads = soldiers (British soldiers wore red coats)

Remember this Sabbath Day (December third), to keep it holy = derived from Exodus 20:8 in the Bible, “Remember the sabbath day and keep it holy”
Exodus 20:8 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 12 January 2013)
Exodus 20”, New Advent (accessed 12 January 2013)
Exodus 20:8”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 12 January 2013)

repondis je = (French) “I answered”

requiescant in pace = (Latin) “rest in peace” (commonly abbreviated as “RIP”)

restituere = (Latin) “restore” (or “bring back”, or “make good”)
restituere”, Latdict: Latin Dictionary and Grammar Resources (accessed 18 January 2013)
Joseph Esmond Riddle and Thomas Kerchever Arnold. A Copious and Critical English-Latin lexicon, Founded on the German-Latin Dictionary of Dr. Charles Ernest Georges (8th edition), Longmans, Green, and Co. and J. and H. Rivington, London, 1865, pages 148 (“condition”), 163 (“restore”), and 165 (“return”) (accessed 18 January 2013)

risum teneatis amici = (Latin) “could you keep from laughing, friends?”; from “Ars Poetica” (“The Art of Poetry”), line 5, by Horace (Quintus Horatius Flaccus, 65 BC – 8 BC)
Horace (edited by James Tate). Horatius Restitutus: or The Books of Horace Arranged in Chronological Order According to the Scheme of Dr. Bentley, Baldwin & Craddock, London, 1837, page 236 (accessed 29 December 2012)
Jon R. Stone. The Routledge Dictionary of Latin Quotations: The Illiterati’s Guide to Latin Maxims, Mottoes, Proverbs, and Sayings, Routledge, New York, 2005, page 313 (accessed 29 December 2012)
Q. Horatii Flacci Ars Poetica”, The Latin Library (accessed 29 December 2012)

salvum fac populum tuum Domine = (Latin) “save your people, O Lord”, or “preserve, O Lord, thy people”; from the Latin thanksgiving hymn “Te Deum” used in the Roman Catholic Church (believed to have been written by Saint Nicetas in the fourth century)
Christina Lea Bausman. The Organ Te Deum: Its History and Practice, Arizona State University, page 3 (accessed 29 December 2012)
The Roman Missal for the Use of the Laity: Containing the Masses Appointed to be said Throughout the Year, P. Keating, Brown & Keating, London, 1815, pages 702, 704 [facsimile edition] (accessed 29 December 2012)
F. Brittain. Medieval Latin and Romance Lyric to A.D. 1300, Cambridge University Press, second edition, 1951, pages 63-64 [digital edition, 2009] (accessed 29 December 2012)

Sa Majeste La Reine Victoria = (French) “Her Majesty The Queen Victoria”

sermo quem auditis non est meus, sed ejus qui misit me, nempe Patris = (Latin) “the word which you have heard is not mine; but the Father’s who sent me”; from John 14:24 in the Latin Bible
[translated by Théodore de Bèze]. Novum Testamentum Latine [The New Testament of Our Lord Jesus Christ], D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1863, page 123
John 14”, New Advent (accessed 3 January 2013)
John 14:24”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 3 January 2013)

shicer = an unproductive mine

sic = (Latin) literally, “thus” (said to be used as a shortening of the phrase is “sic erat scriptum”, i.e. “thus it had been written”); “sic” is placed in brackets after text that may otherwise appear to be a mistake, to show that the quoted text is rendered accurately (as it had been written); in this case, Carboni apparently felt that his quoting of the sentence referring to “Australian independence” may have been questioned

Si cessi il pianto, l’ira si gusti = (Italian) “Cease your tears, savour your anger”

*sic sinuerunt Fata = (Latin) “so bay Fates” or “it folds Fates” (*rough translation) [this phrase is used in chapters LXIV (64) and LXXXIII (83)]

Signore = (Italian) “Sir”, or “mister”

silver and gold lace = presumably a broad reference to government officials

sine die = (Latin) “without day”; in legal terms “sine die” means “without a day being fixed”; in this instance, without a day being designated for a trial
Eliezer Edwards. Words, Facts, & Phrases: A Dictionary of Curious, Quaint, & Out-of-the-Way Matters, Chatto & Windus, London, 1897, page 516 (accessed 10 January 2013)

sine qua non = (Latin) literally, “without which not”, a phrase used to denote something which is absolutely indispensable
Eliezer Edwards. Words, Facts, & Phrases: A Dictionary of Curious, Quaint, & Out-of-the-Way Matters, Chatto & Windus, London, 1897, page 516 (accessed 10 January 2013)

sit nomen Domini benedictum = (Latin) “Blessed be the name of the Lord”; from Psalm 112:2 in the Latin Vulgate Bible [in various other Bibles, this is in Psalm 113:2, as the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible]
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page 433 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalm 113”, New Advent (accessed 29 December 2012)
Psalm 113:2”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 29 December 2012)
Psalmi 112:2 : Clementine Latin Vulgate Bible parallelDouay-Rheims, Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 10 January 2013)

sitting on a rail, Mary = a reference to the song “Lament of the Irish Emigrant”, also known by its first line “I’m sitting on the stile, Mary”, written by Helen Selina Blackwood (Lady Dufferin) (1807-1867); the identity of the composer of the music is in question, being attributed to both William R. Dempster and George Barker
Helen Selina, Lady Dufferin. 1807–1867: 691. Lament of the Irish Emigrant”, Bartleby.com (accessed 12 January 2013)
I’m Sitting on the Stile, Mary (The Irish Emigrant II)”, Folklorist (accessed 12 January 2013)
Helen Blackwood, Baroness Dufferin and Claneboye”, Wikipedia (accessed 12 January 2013)
Recollections”, Geelong Advertiser (Geelong, Vic.), Saturday 7 August 1841, page 4 (accessed 12 January 2013)
Miss Hayes’s concert”, The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Friday 3 November 1854, page 5 (accessed 12 January 2013)
New music. — The Irish Emigrant Quadrille” [advertisement], The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, NSW), Saturday 27 August 1859, page 7 (accessed 12 January 2013)

sotto voce = (Italian) “in a quite voice”, “under the breath” (literally, “under the voice”); in the theatre, “sotto voce” is used as a dramatic device by an actor saying something in a lowered voice or hushed tone

souvenirs de Melbourne = (French) “souvenirs of Melbourne”

* Strada maestra in citta e campagna = (Italian) “Road master in town and country” (*rough translation)

*Storta congiugazione = (Italian) “Retort jointing” (*rough translation)

St. Patrick’s Hall = St. Patrick’s Hall (in Melbourne, Victoria) was the meeting place of the Legislative Council of Victoria from 1851 to 1856, after which the Legislative Council used the newly-built Parliament House of Victoria

Stultus dicit in corde suo, “non est Deus.” = “The fool has said in his heart, There is no God” from Psalm 13:1 in the Latin Vulgate Bible [in various other Bibles, this is in Psalm 14:1, as the numbering of the Psalms varies between different versions of the Bible]; although Carboni’s use of “stultus dicit” (*“stupid says”) differs from the Clementine Latin Vulgate and the Biblia Sacra Vulgatam, which use “dixit insipiens” (*“the fool [says]”), i.e. “Dixit insipiens in corde suo: Non est Deus” [Johann Friedrich Stapfer, in Institutiones Theologiæ Polemicæ Universae (third edition, 1757), uses the same wording as Carboni, “Psalm. XIV. I. dicens: Stultus dicit in Corde suo, non est Deus”]
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page 395 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Joh. Frid. Stapferi. Institutiones Theologiæ Polemicæ Universæ, Ordine Scientifico Dispositæ (volume 2), Tiguri apud Heideggerum et Socios [*“Huts with Heidegger and allies”], 1757 (3rd edition), page 608 (20th line) (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalms 13:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallelChristian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 4 January 2013)
Psalm 14”, New Advent [Psalm 14:1] (accessed 4 January 2013)
Psalm 14:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 4 January 2013)

sua cuique voluntas = (Latin) “for each man his own will”, or “everyone has his own will”; possibly from “De Rerum Natura” (“On the Nature of Things”), Book 2 (line 261), by Lucretius (Titus Lucretius Carus, ca. 96 BC – ca. 50 BC), or from “De Re Rustica” (“On Farming”) by Columella (Lucius Junius Moderatus Columella, 4 – ca. 70) [also translated as “voluntary will” or “individual will”]
Titi Lvcreti Cari De Rervm Natvra Liber Secvndvs”, The Latin Library (accessed 29 December 2012)
John Masson. The Atomic Theory of Lucretius Contrasted with Modern Doctrines of Atoms and Evolution, George Bell and Sons, London, 1884, pages 125, 126 (accessed 29 December 2012)
Algernon Paul Sinker. Introduction to Lucretius, University Press, 1937, page 28 (accessed 29 December 2012)
Lucretius [translated by Martin Ferguson Smith]. On the Nature of Things, Hackett Publishing, 2001, page 41 (accessed 29 December 2012)
De Re Rustica: L. Junii Columellae”, Bill Thayer, University of Chicago (accessed 29 December 2012)

sufficit diei sua vexatio = (Latin) “sufficient for the day his vexation”; from Matthew 6:34 in the Latin Bible; although the phrase in Matthew 6:34 is usually translated into Latin as “sufficit diei malitia sua” (“sufficient for the day is the evil [malice] thereof”, or “each day has enough trouble of its own”) [“malitia” being “malice”, “vexatio” being “vexation”]
[translated by y Théodore de Bèze.] Novum Testamentum Domini Nostri Jesu Christi, D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1863, page 7 [“sufficit diei sua vexatio”]
Matthew 6”, New Advent (accessed 30 December 2012)
Matthew 6:34”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 30 December 2012)
Matthew 6 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 30 December 2012)

*sunt leges: vis ultima lex: tunc aut libertas aut servitudo; mors enim benedicta = (Latin) “are the laws: the highest faculty is a law, then either freedom of speech or slavery; for blessed is the death of” (*rough translation)

*Sunt miserie in vita hominus, viro probo dolosis circumdari! Nulla miseria pejor = (Latin) “Misery that are the life of a man, a good man surrounded deceitful! No worse than the misery” (*rough translation)

*sunt tempora nostra = (Latin) “these are our times” (*rough translation) [Carboni uses the phrase “sunt tempora nostra” in chapters I (1), LXXXIX (89), XCVIII (98), and C (100)]

*Sunt tempora nostra! nam perdidi spem: Melior nunc lingua favere = (Latin) “There are times in our! I lost hope for: improved language support now” (*rough translation) [Carboni uses the phrase “sunt tempora nostra” in chapters I (1), LXXXIX (89), XCVIII (98), and C (100)]

*sunt tempora nostra; non mutabimur nec mutamur in illis ; jam perdidi spem = (Latin) “there are times of ours; does not change nor change with them; already lost my hope” (*rough translation) [Carboni uses the phrase “sunt tempora nostra” in chapters I (1), LXXXIX (89), XCVIII (98), and C (100)]

Tartuffe = (French) “The Impostor”, a famous French comedy play by Molière (Jean-Baptiste Poquelin, 1622 – 1673), which had as its main character the hypocrite Tartuffe, and so the word “Tartuffe” came to mean a hypocrite who pretends to be very virtuous but who is not
Tartuffe”, Encyclopædia Britannica (accessed 31 January 2013)
Tartuffe”, Wikipedia (accessed 31 January 2013)

taedet animam meam vitae meae = (Latin) “my soul is weary of my life”; from Job 10:1 in the Latin Bible
Job 10”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Job 10:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Job 10:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)

teatro = (Italian) theater

tempora nostra = (Latin) “our times”

tempore suo = (Latin) “due time”, or “appointed time” (possibly a Biblical reference, as this phrase appears in Numbers 9:2 of the Latin Bible)
Numbers 9”, New Advent (accessed 29 December 2012)
Numbers 9:2”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 29 December 2012)
Numbers 9:2 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 29 December 2012)

The Preacher = Ecclesiastes (in the Bible); The New Oxford Annotated Bible with the Apocrypha (2007) says “Ecclesiastes is a Latin transliteration of the Greek rendering of the pen-name of the author, known in Hebrew as Qohelet (“Gatherer,” traditionally “the Teacher” or “the Preacher”)” [the text quoted by Carboni is from Ecclesiastes 1:13-14 in the Bible]
[Ecclesiastes text]:
Ecclesiastes 1”, New Advent (accessed 6 January 2013)
The Preacher (Ecclesiastes):
Michael D. Coogan, Marc Z. Brettler, Carol A. Newsom, and Pheme Perkins [editors]. The New Oxford Annotated Bible: New Revised Standard Version with the Apocrypha (augmented third edition), Oxford University Press, New York, 2007, page 944 (accessed 6 January 2013)

The Southern Cross, in digger’s gore imbrued, was torn away, and left the digger mourning = this is the title of chapter LX (60) of The Eureka Stockade, which was taken from the song “Victoria’s Southern Cross”, written by Raffaello Carboni, which appears in chapter LXXXII (82); the words “in digger’s gore imbrued” may be a reference to Sir Walter Scott’s poem “The Bridal of Triermain” (canto III, section XIII), which includes the line “Were oft in Scottish gore imbrued”
[Walter Scott]. The Bridal of Triermain, or The Vale of St John, James Ballantyne and Co., Edinburgh, 1813, page 147 (accessed 9 January 2013)
The Bridal of Triermain”, Wikipedia (accessed 9 January 2013)

The State Prisoners = this was a phrase used in various newspaper reports of the time to refer to the men on trial for the Eureka uprising [Carboni uses the same title for chapters LXXI (71) and LXXX (80)].
The State Prisoners”, The Sydney Morning Herald (Sydney, NSW), Wednesday 17 January 1855, page 5
Colonial news” [see section entitled “Trials of the State Prisoners”], The Maitland Mercury and Hunter River General Advertiser (Maitland, NSW), Saturday 27 January 1855, page 2 of the supplement
The State Prisoners” [letter], The Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Geelong, Vic.), Tuesday 30 January 1855, page 3
The Ballarat State Prisoners”, The Geelong Advertiser and Intelligencer (Geelong, Vic.), Friday 23 February 1855, page 2
Legislative Council” [see section entitled “The State Prisoners”], The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Friday 2 March 1855, page 4
The State Prisoners” [letter], The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Saturday 3 March 1855, page 6
Bendigo” [see section entitled “The State Prisoners”], The Argus (Melbourne, Vic.), Tuesday 27 March 1855, page 6

The Times = in this context, this is a reference to the newspaper “The Ballarat Times”

Toorak = a reference to the government of Victoria; Toorak House was the residence of the Governors of Victoria from 1854 to 1876

tota domus duo sunt, iidem parentque jubentque = (Latin) “the whole family are but two; the same persons both obey and command”; from Metamorphoses, book VIII (line 636), by Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC – 17 AD) [“tota domus duo sunt, idem parentque iubentque”]
P. Ovidi Nasonis Metamorphosen Liber Octavvs”, The Latin Library (accessed 9 January 2013)
Ovid (edited by Rev. John Bond and Arthur S. Walpole). Stories from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, Macmillan and Co., New York, 1894, page 9 [“Philemon and Baucis (viii 618-724)”] (accessed 9 January 2013)
Ovid (translated by Henry T. Riley). The Metamorphoses of Ovid Digireads, [Lawrence, Kansas], 2009, page 164 (accessed 9 January 2013)

to be or not to be = from a speech given by Prince Hamlet in the play “Hamlet” (Act 3, Scene 1) by William Shakespeare (1564 BC – 1616 BC); “To be, or not to be: that is the question”
The Tragedy of Hamlet, Prince of Denmark: Act 3, Scene 1”, The Complete Works of William Shakespeare, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (accessed 31 January 2013)

*Tout cela, n’est pas precisement comme chez nous, pas vrai = (French) “All this is not precisely like ours, not true” (*rough translation)

*tout cela soit dit en passant = (French) “all this by the way” or “all that by the way” (*rough translation)

tout comme chez nous = (French) “just as it is at home”
William Carpenter [revised by Rev. W. Webster]. A Comprehensive Dictionary of English Synonyms, William Tegg, London, 1865, page 304

traps = police (Australian slang)

tres vieux = (French) “very old”

troopers = mounted police

trowsers = old spelling of “trousers”

*Tunc justus ut palma florescit. = “Then the just like the palm flourishes.”

*turbatus est a furore oculus meus = (Latin) “my eye is troubled”; from Psalm 6:8 in the Latin Vulgate Bible, “Turbatus est a furore oculus meus; inveteravi inter omnes inimicos meos” (“My eye is troubled through indignation; I have grown old amongst all my enemies”, or “My eyes are filled with grief; I have grown feeble in the midst of my enemies”) [unlike most of the chapter in the Book of Psalms, Psalm 6 is not numbered differently in other versions of the Bible]
Biblia Sacra Vulgatae Editionis, Nicolaum Pezzana [Nicolas Pezzana], Venetiis [Venice, Italy], 1669, page 393 (accessed 20 January 2013)
Psalms 6”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalms 6:8 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam ”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Psalmus VI (Nova Vulgata): Psalm 6 (6)”, Thesaurus Precum Latinarum: Treasury of Latin Prayers (accessed 9 January 2013)

ubi caro, ibi vultures = (Latin) “where the flesh is, there are vultures”; derived from Matthew 24:28 in the Latin Bible: “ubicumque fuerit corpus, illic congregabuntur et aquilae [aquilæ]”, i.e. “wherever the body is, the vultures will gather” (in this context, “aquilae” is translated in various editions of the Bible as “eagles” or “vultures”) [Carboni uses this phrase in chapters 6 and 13]
Matthew 24”, Veritas Bible (accessed 4 January 2013)
Matthew 24:8”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 4 January 2013)
Matthew 24 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallelChristian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 4 January 2013)
Ludovicus Pelt [Anton Friedrich Ludwig Pelt]. Epistolas Pauli Apostoli ad Thessalonicenses: Perpetuo Illustravit Commentario, Gryphiswaldiae, London, 1880, [page 34] [“Ubicunque cadaver projectum sit, ibi vultures convenire”] (accessed 4 January 2013)

*una scintilla, sparasi la bomba, spalanca a multitudini la tomba = (Italian) “a spark, shooting the bomb, he opens multitudes a tomb” (*rough translation)

*un bon calcio, e la canaglia, stronca va come la paglia = (Italian) “a bon soccer, and the rogue, strangles [rushes] is like straw” (*rough translation)

unde bella et pugna inter vos [unde bella et pugnae inter vos] = (Latin) “From whence are wars and contentions among you?”, or, “What is the source of quarrels and conflicts among you?”, or “What causes these fights and quarrels among you?”; from James 4:1 in the Latin Bible
Novum Testamentum Domini Nostri Jesu Christi D. Appleton & Company, New York, 1863, page 259 (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4”, New Advent (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)
James 4:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 7 January 2013)

urbe et argo = (Latin) “city and Argos” [presumably a classical reference, but one that has not been located, so it is unclear what Carboni is referring to here, although Argos is a city in Greece, as well as being a region (Argolis) in Greece, and a constellation in the southern hemisphere located between Canis Major and the Southern Cross, named after the hundred-eyed monster Argos (Argus) of Greek mythology; also, Argo was the name of the ship, designed by Argos (Argus), which carried Jason and the Argonauts of Greek legend]
Argos:
The Eumenides”, Johnson [further details not available], Southern Illinois University (accessed 18 January 2013)
Jason”, Mythagora: Greek Mythology from The Iliad to the Fall of the Last Tyrant (accessed 18 January 2013)
Merriam-Webster’s Collegiate Dictionary (Eleventh Edition), Merriam-Webster, USA, 2004, page 66 (accessed 18 January 2013)
Pavo – the Peacock”, Sullacrestadellonda (accessed 18 January 2013)
Argo”, Wikipedia (accessed 18 January 2013)
Argos”, Wikipedia (accessed 18 January 2013)
Argos (dog)”, Wikipedia (accessed 18 January 2013)

urbis et orbis terrarum = (Latin) “the city and the world”; derived from “Fasti” (book II, line 684), by Ovid (Publius Ovidius Naso, 43 BC – 17 AD) “romanae spatium est urbis et orbis idem” (“the space of the city of Rome is the space of the world”, i.e. “the domains of Rome’s city and the world are one”); “urbis et orbis” is also used to denote certain Papal blessings
romanae spatium est urbis et orbis idem:
P. Ovidi Nasonis Fastorvm Liber Secvndvs”, The Latin Library (accessed 14 January 2013)
Johann P Arnason, S. N. Eisenstadt, and Björn Wittrock (editors). Axial Civilizations and World History, Koninklijke Brill, Leiden (The Netherlands), 2005, page 445 (accessed 14 January 2013)
Urbi et Orbi”, New Advent (accessed 14 January 2013)
Urbi et Orbi”, Wikipedia (accessed 14 January 2013)

Vandemonians = Tasmanians; people from Van Diemen’s Land (Tasmania) were known as Vandemonians, and were widely regarded as having the convict taint upon them, due to the fact that Van Diemen’s Land was the recipient of about 40% of convicts sent to Australia, and continued to receive convicts from the UK for over a decade after the transportation of convicts to New South Wales had ceased (transportation ended in 1840 in NSW, and in 1853 in Tasmania); in the context of the goldfields, a “Vandemonian” was a rough and nasty character

Vendetta gridando al Dio de giusti = (Italian) “Vengeance! Shouting to the God of the just”

*Veritas vero lente passu passu sicut puer, tandem aliquando janunculat ad lucem. = “The truth, however, as the young man slowly hand in hand hand in hand, and at last to the light janunculat at any time.”

veritatem dico non mentior = (Latin) “I say the truth, I lie not”, or “I am telling the truth, I am not lying”; from 1 Timothy 2:7 in the Latin Bible [the same phrase (“veritatem dico, non mentior”) is used in chapters LVIII (58), LXXIII (73), and LXXIX (79) of The Eureka Stockade]; a similar phrase appears in Romans 9:1 in the Latin Bible, “veritatem dico in Christo, non mentior” (“I speak the truth in Christ, I lie not”, or “I am telling the truth in Christ, I am not lying”)
veritatem dico, non mentior:
1 Timothy 2:7”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
1 Timothy 2:7”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
1 Timothy 2:7 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Epistula Pauli AD ;Timotheum I”, The Latin Library (accessed 9 January 2013)
veritatem dico in Christo, non mentior:
Romans 9”, New Advent (accessed 9 January 2013)
Romans 9:1”, Online Multilingual Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Romans 9:1 : Douay-Rheims Bible parallel: Christian Community, New Jerusalem, Clementine Latin Vulgate, Biblia Sacra Vulgatam”, Veritas Bible (accessed 9 January 2013)
Epistula Pauli AD Romanos”, The Latin Library (accessed 9 January 2013)

*vestesi il lupo in pecora tra liagnelle [vesti il lupo in pecora tra li agnelle] = (Italian) “the wolf in sheep’s clothing among them lambs” (*rough translation)

Victoria’s Southern Cross = a reference to the flag flown by the Eureka miners (which depicted a stylised Southern Cross), now commonly known as the Eureka Flag

vide = (French) blank, empty, vacant, void

*viri probi, spes mea in vobis; nam fides nostra in deo optimo maximo = (Latin) “the men be honest, my hope is in you, for our faith in God, the Greatest and Best” (*rough translation)

**vous etez [etes] bien bon, Monsieur le Commissionaire, repondis-je = (French) “you are very kind, Mr. Commissionaire, I replied” (*rough translation)

vox populi, vox Dei = (Latin) “the voice of the people is the voice of God”
vox populi, vox Dei”, Merriam-Webster Online (accessed 10 January 2013)
Vox populi”, Wikipedia (accessed 10 January 2013)





Click here for part one of the glossary (covering A-K)

Speak Your Mind

*