Love the Dreamer [poem by Norman L. Beurle, 29 September 1900]

[Editor: This poem by Norman L. Beurle was published in The Australasian (Melbourne), 29 September 1900.]

Love, the Dreamer.

Love, the Dreamer, came to me
One fair day in early spring;.
Whispered, “Follow,” then each tree
Laughed in joyous blossoming;
Then the breath of wood and sea
Seemed of Paradise to sing.

So I followed, glad and free,
In a dream of passioned bliss;
Found the Land he promised me,
Where the Queen of Beauty is;
Saw her dreaming ’neath a tree.
Ran to wake her with a kiss.

But a Form uprose between —
“Honour” is his name, they say —
Stood upon the flowered green,
Pointed to the hand that lay
On the breast of Beauty’s Queen;
Then the sky turned cold and grey.

Sparkled there a gleaming ring,
With a name engraved thereon;
“Why didst thou me hither bring?”
Love’s sweet face grew sad and wan;
Love, the Dreamer, spread his wing,
Left me in the wood alone.

Then the glory and the dream
Passed in silent gloom away;
Now I wander by the stream,
In the shady wood, and pray
That, with laugh and sunny gleam,
Love may come again some day.

NORMAN L. BEURLE.
Kenmare.



Source:
The Australasian (Melbourne, Vic.), 29 September 1900, p. 723

Editor’s notes:
hither = here (e.g. “come hither”); to or toward a place; near, on this side

’neath = beneath

wan = having a sickly or pale appearance; a poorly appearance suggestive of unhappiness or grief; a lack of energy or feeling (e.g. a smile or laugh, displaying little effort, energy, or enthusiasm); lacking good health or vitality (may also refer to something which is dim or faint, e.g. light, stars, sun)

Old words/spelling in the original text:
didst (did)
thou (you)

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