Government and general orders: Civil Department [order to drive on the left side of the road, 19 August 1820]

[Editor: A directive from Governor Lachlan Macquarie, ordering that all traffic in New South Wales shall drive on the left side of the roads. Published in the Sydney Gazette and New South Wales Advertiser (Sydney, NSW), 19 August 1820.]

Government and general orders.

Government House, Sydney,
15th August, 1820.

Civil Department.

Much Inconvenience and Delay, accompanied by Danger of personal Injury, arising to Persons travelling on the High-ways, either on Foot or on Horseback, or with Cars, Carts, Drays, Waggons, Timber and other Carriages, owing to Horsemen and the Drivers of the said Carriages of every Description, either intentionally driving, or suffering their Cattle to cross the Road, instead of keeping them steadily on their proper Side, the Governor is pleased to order and direct, that all Persons driving Cars, Carts, Drays, Waggons, Timber and other Carriages, shall observe the same Regulations as directed in England, by keeping and driving their Carriages, of whatever Description, on their own left Side, commonly called the near Side of the Roads, on Pain of being fined by a Bench of Magistrates, any Sum not exceeding Ten Shillings for every such Offence: One-half whereof is to go to the Person or Persons proving the Fact; and the other Moiety in Aid of the Police Fund. The Constables and all other Peace Officers are hereby called on and directed to be vigilant in enforcing this Order, without Distinction of Persons, as they will answer for the Contrary at their Peril.

By His Excellency’s Command,
J. T. Campbell, Secretary.



Source:
Sydney Gazette, and New South Wales Advertiser (Sydney, NSW), 19 August 1820, p. 1

Editor’s notes:
car = an abbreviation of “carriage”

moiety = a part, portion, or share (especially regarding a lesser portion); one of two parts; (archaic) a half

waggon = an archaic spelling of “wagon”

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